Take a Break! The 50/10 Rule

Like most people around you, the thought of working straight through the day without small breaks in between seems like a daunting task. The mornings go by slowly, lunch doesn't feel long enough, and the afternoons drag on longer than the mornings. 

We found a really great article that suggests the 50/10 rule. It's simple: work for 50 minutes, take a 10 minute break. 

50 minutes is long enough to get a great deal of work done, and not so long that your mind starts to burn out. Similarly, 10 minutes is long enough to recharge, and not so long that you lose focus. 

The article has 5 main tips for making this type of schedule work for you: 

1. Stamina - As we mentioned before, a full work day without small breaks is nearly impossible. Taking a 10 minute break after 50 minutes of productive work allows you to recharge and come back with a focused and sharp mind. 

2. Focus - Don't let anything distract you during your 50 minutes of work. Put your cell phone away and zone in on what you are doing. The results will amaze you. 

3. Side-Productivity - Use your 10 minute break to do anything you wish. You could read a portion of the book you're working through, go for a walk, catch up on your social media - it doesn't matter what you do, as long as you consider it to be a break from your daily work tasks. 

4. Progress Tracking - When you break your day into 50/10 portions, you can easily keep track of exactly how much time you're spending on a project. Keep track of the time you spend and the number of projects you complete and see how rewarding this system really is. 

5. Mastery - When you keep track of the exact amount of time you spent working on something, you know just how long it took you to perfect it. Use your time wisely and you'll feel accomplished. 

So, what are you waiting for?! Give this a try and see how much more productive you are throughout the day! 

 

How Do You Increase Workplace Productivity?

We recently read an article that suggested each person has a different time of day in which they are the most productive; some people love to wake up for an early morning workout, while others to prefer to wake up and enjoy a cup of coffee before beginning their days. Either way, it’s important to allow your employees to work in a way that will benefit them, therefore increasing productivity and personal investment in the work place.

 

With a rise in millennials joining the work force, a higher importance is being placed on flexibility within the work place. Employees value the ability to leave early for a personal circumstance, if need be. This applies to working parents who wish to attend their children’s extra-curricular activities, as well as single people who have personal commitments outside of work. This isn’t to say that you should allow your employees to leave early every day, but allowing them the freedom to enjoy their personal life shows that you, as a business owner, place importance on your employees’ happiness.

 

Another interesting idea the article mentions is allowing your employees time to develop creative ideas away from their desk. Sitting at a desk and answering emails for eight hours a day can become robotic; as an employer, you should try to encourage your employees to take a walk at lunch, or to simply get up and stroll around the office every now and then. This will encourage creative thinking and new ideas as your employees experience a change of scenery and give their brains a small break.

 

In our office, we make a point of visiting new restaurants for team lunches, or we eat lunch outside on sunny days. As the insurance industry can become repetitive, we take the time to walk around the office, give our minds a break, and visit our co-workers to share ideas or work through problems together. It is very important to us to maintain a positive work environment with happy employees who feel supported, taken care of, and pleased to come to work each day.

What do you do in your office to increase productivity?


To read the article referenced, click here